International Horror and Scifi Film Festival

Feral

feral

A group of medical school students venture into the woods for a camping trip. On the first night they are attacked by something. Once bitten, they become infected with a strange disease and it’s changing them into dangerous creatures. The students will have to use their medical knowledge and whatever survival skills they have to escape with their lives.

This tale of survival is directed by Mark H. Young (Tooth and Nail, Wicked Blood) and written by both Young and first-time screenwriter Adam Frazier. On the surface, the plot will seem very familiar. A group of college kids going into the woods and then being terrorized by some unknown creature is a concept that has been done time and time again. There are some thrilling and frightening moments mixed in with some more predictable ones (such as the obvious foreshadowing of who the first victims will be). The filmmakers use two methods to try to make Feral stand apart; the leading couple is a lesbian couple, and instead of just a monster in the woods there is a “feral virus.”

When it comes to having a prominent lesbian couple, the film has some high and low points. First and foremost is that the couple doesn’t fall into the typical stereotypes commonly found in film. There isn’t one woman that is more “butch” and one that is more “femme,” they are not man-hating, and their sexual orientation isn’t all they talk about or what defines them. In this way, the couple is very well developed compared to other films. The biggest drawback is the fact that they are two women in a relationship was brought up to much by other other characters, putting it in the spotlight and focusing a lot of the non-monster drama on that relationship and what others thought of it.

The virus itself is very interesting. Calling it a “feral” virus implies it might be some kind of rabies-like virus that infects the host and makes them hyper-violent. This is somewhat true in the film, but the virus also kills the host then brings them back to life as a bloodthirsty creature. There are even physical changes such as hair loss, yellow eyes, pale skin, elongated ears, and razor sharp teeth and claws. It honestly comes across as very muddled, like it is a rabies virus that turns the victims into zombie-vampire monsters. The origin of the virus is also underdeveloped. We learn that some creature in the woods bit a man, and that is supposedly how it all started. This opens up so many questions. What was the creature? Why do humans seem to be the only ones affected? Why hasn’t the virus reached outside the forest? It is good to leave some mystery for viewers, but this origin is simply too vague. Unfortunately, by trying to create something new and original, instead audiences will get something that is more confusing than anything else.

The origin of the creatures may be a bit fuzzy, but the creature design itself is pretty creepy. The makeup design does a great job of making each infected individual look similar, showing how the virus physically changes a person in the same way. The overall look reminds me of a vampire, but much more wild and ferocious than one would normally expect. The first time a creature is shown on screen is probably the most frightening part of the entire film. You can just barely make it out in the darkness as it stares down its victim. By the time you get a good look at the creature, it’s too late. There is also a healthy amount of blood and gore in the film. They do a great job of showing the attack wounds and how those eventually translate to an infected creature.

This film has some great actors who have made a name for themselves in the horror industry. Scout Taylor-Compton (Halloween, Cynthia) plays the main character, Alice. What makes Taylor-Compton’s performance stand out is how natural she portrays Alice. She is the most comfortable in the woods and remains cool under the most stressful circumstances, taking a natural leadership role in the group without any unnecessary bravado. She also has fantastic on-screen chemistry with Olivia Luccardi (It Follows, Chanel Zero: Butcher’s Block), who plays Jules. She stands out because Jules is the only one not part of the original group of friends. She is really only there because of her relationship with Alice. Luccardi portrays Jules as the outsider of the group, which makes her attempts to step up and be strong even more compelling. The most surprising performance of the film is Lew Temple (The Devil’s Rejects, 31) as Talbot. The character is interesting because Talbot functions as the harbinger archetype commonly found in horror films, but he is developed even further into a main character. Temple does a great job of making Talbot a strange mixture of sympathetic and ominous, which is not easy to achieve. The film has an overall well-rounded cast who know how to bring intensity to their performances.

Feral brings excitement and terror to the “monster in the woods” subgenre of horror. It successfully brings some elements to the plot that make it stand out from other similar films, such as including LGBTQ characters and changing up the familiar harbinger trope. There are also some standout performances from horror actors fans know and love, and creepy creature design that will make you not want to go into the woods. Where the film falls short is in the virus that creates the frightening creature. The underdeveloped background almost takes away from the fear of the virus and what it does because it simply doesn’t make sense. The film is entertaining enough, but it will likely be forgotten by the end of the year.

OVERALL RATING: 5/10

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Revenge

revenge

Jen goes to an extravagant vacation house with her rich boyfriend. While there, her boyfriend’s friends show up early for their annual hunting trip. After a seemingly normal night of drinking, laughs, and dancing, things take a turn. Jen is attacked by one of the friends. After that moment everything spirals out of control, and Jen is left for dead. The men never expected her to survive, and they will soon come to regret it.

Rape-revenge films are fairly common in the thriller/horror genre. They all tend to follow certain rules and tropes, but French writer/director Coralie Fargeat brings audiences something fresh to her first feature-length film. This film being written and directed by a woman makes a huge difference in how not only the victim, but the rape itself is portrayed. One of the biggest differences is that, traditionally, the victims in these types of films are always sweet, virginal, innocent young women. In real life, women are not always the delicate victim in a white dress. Jen is very provocative with what she wears, she is flirtatious, and her boyfriend is a married man. Having an “imperfect” victim allows Fargeat to reinforce the idea that no always means no. It doesn’t matter if a girl was flirting with a man, or dancing with him, or anything else. When she says she does not want to have sex with a man, it needs to be respected. It is quite refreshing to see a more authentic character, and it only allows Fargeat to send a stronger message about rape culture. The final confrontation leaves the male in a vulnerable state while Jen is in a state of power, which makes it all the more satisfying to watch.

The rape scene itself is also treated much differently than in past films. In other films of the same genre the scenes are often long and drawn out to the point of making everyone in the audience very uncomfortable. While this is an effective method, Fargeat uses a different tactic. She made the decision to focus more on the events leading up to the rape. Then, during the act itself, everything is shown slightly out of focus. This allows the audience’s eye to be drawn to other things going on. One specific shot focuses simply on Jen’s hand against a sliding glass door as she is being attacked, but then the camera focuses on the reflection in the glass of another character going for a swim like nothing is happening. It is a tasteful and visually interesting way to film the scene.

The various character arcs are truly fantastic, and the performances make them even better. Matilda Lutz (Rings, The Fifth Wheel) plays Jen. When Jen is first introduced, she seems like just another party girl. As the film progresses, Lutz gets the chance to show Jen as a survivor. In a way, even her relationship with her married boyfriend is a method of survival. Lutz does a fantastic job of conveying Jen’s strength, especially in the climax of the film. Kevin Janssens (The Ardennes, Vermist) plays Jen’s boyfriend, Richard. What makes Janssens performance stand out is how, at first glance, he appears to be the perfect guy. As the film progresses, Janssens gets to show that Richard is a sociopath who cares for no one but himself. It is amazing to see the initial chemistry between Lutz and Janssens, and how quickly that all changes after Jen is attacked. Another compelling performance is from Vincent Colombe (Point Blank, My King) as Stan. Stan is Jen’s attacker. What I love about Colombe’s performance is how unwilling he was to face the consequences of attacking Jen. It is very satisfying to watch him continually fall apart as the film progresses, after letting his entitlement get the better of him.

The artistic aspects of Revenge are absolutely stunning. Much like the scene I described earlier, the cinematography brings a lot of beauty to the film. A large portion of the film is in a very stark, dead landscape, yet the way various scenes are shot brings everything to life. Even the sets chosen make the film gorgeous. The vacation house specifically gave the filmmakers a chance to really play with some fascinating angles and use of color. This is especially utilized in the climax for one of the most intense and breathtaking scenes of the entire film, putting an emphasis on bright colors, lots of blood, and amazing long-takes. The only true negative I can say for this film involves one visual element. At one point Jen uses a heated up beer can to cauterize a wound, leaving a burn impression on her skin of the beer logo. The problem is that the logo and lettering should be reversed, but when her skin is revealed it is not.

Another amazing artistic aspect is the film’s score. The score was composed by Rob, who is also known for scoring films such as Horns and Maniac. The electronic music, with very subtle 80’s vibes, goes will with some of the color choices used throughout the film. Rob’s music is fantastic because it blends in with the background when necessary. Yet, when the music really gets going, it elicits strong emotions in the audience (especially when it comes to getting behind Jen as she exacts her revenge). The score really only adds to the quality of the film and brings it to the next level.

Revenge is an intense, mesmerizing, and extremely brutal film. I can say without a doubt this film was my favorite at the International Horror and Sci-fi Film festival. Watching a rape-revenge film made by a woman made a huge difference in the film style and imagery, and it was for the better. Fargeat creates a compelling story with dynamic, raw characters. It sends a message about rape culture, while also being a stunning and entertaining film. The filmmaking, acting, artistry, and music make this film stand out from the crowd. Revenge is one you will not want to miss.

OVERALL RATING: 9.5/10

Wildling

wildling

Her entire life Anna has been locked away in an attic. Her father says it is to keep her safe from the Wildling, a vicious monster who ate all the other children. At the age of 16, Anna ends up free from the attic and taken in by the town sheriff. As she begins to go through the changes of puberty, she faces other changes as well. It seems that the stories Anna was told as a child aren’t quite what they seem.

Fritz Böhm makes his feature film directorial debut, while also having cowrote the film with Florian Eder.This film starts out very promising. It begins by following Anna as a child. This gives the audience time to get to know the character while also seeing her strange upbringing. The filmmakers do a very good job of showing Anna’s childlike innocence, despite her being a teenager, when she finally leaves the safety of her attic for the real world. Everything is new and different, and Anna’s reactions are well-written. There is one specific scene that stands out in particular. In it, Anna goes to a high school party. Afterward, she is pursued and attacked by a beast in the woods, creating a unique take on an attempted rape. The way the scene is shot is absolutely stunning, and it has a powerful message that it sends.

Where the film comes apart is when Anna starts to go through her many physical changes. Much of the issues stem from the visual aspects of the film. As Anna first starts to transform, her face looks shockingly dark. Part of this is due to the prosthetics, and part of it is because the entire film is simply much darker than it should be. When the final transformation is finally revealed, the special effects makeup is very well done. My only issue is that it looks a bit too much like a species of Australopithecus. Whether this was an intentional decision I’m not sure, but it felt like a strange de-evolution instead of a transformation into something new. There is also some poorly executed CGI used to enhance various scenes that not only takes away from the imagery, but it also seems unnecessary.

The second half of the film also has some odd character choices. One of those choices is the arc Anna’s father takes. His character does a complete 180 halfway through the film in a way that doesn’t feel genuine to what audiences have already seen of the character. There is also a character who acts as the “harbinger”, commonly seen in horror. The audience never learns who he is or why he’s there, which makes his presence stand out like a sore thumb. It is unfortunate that these things took away from what began as a truly compelling film.

For the most part the performances are the strongest aspect of this film. Bel Powley (A Royal Night Out, Carrie Pilby) plays the mysterious Anna. What makes Powley’s performance so compelling is how she conveys Anna’s innocence and wonder as she discovers new and exciting things out in the real world. Yet, even with how innocent and naive she is, there is still a noticeable strength within her that comes out more and more as the plot progresses. Liv Tyler (The Strangers, Armageddon) plays the town sheriff, Ellen Cooper. It is great to see Tyler in another horror film, but this is not her strongest performance. It isn’t necessarily bad, but it comes across as though she is simply going through the motions instead of putting any true emotion behind her portrayal. Horror legend Brad Dourif (Child’s Play, Alien: Resurrection) plays Anna’s father known only as “Daddy.” While the writing takes his character all over the spectrum, Dourif still does his best with the material he was given. His performance in the first half of the film, when he is caring for Anna as she grows up, is especially fascinating to watch. No matter what the role, Dourif always gives it his all.

Wildling has a promising start, but it comes apart when Anna’s transformation begins. It feels almost like two different films in one, and this unfortunately leads to multiple plot holes and strange character arcs. The dark coloring of the film and poorly used CGI didn’t help this matter. While the practical effects are well done, there is something about the seeming de-evolution of Anna that makes the transformation feel wrong. Luckily, the strong performances by Powley and Dourif help to carry the film from the compelling beginning to the convoluted end. Although this film may not be the strongest first feature film for Böhm and Eder, it is enjoyable enough that I’m interested to see what they do in the future.

OVERALL RATING: 5.5/10

Lowlife

lowlife

El Munstro is the latest in a long and proud line of famed luchadors. While El Munstro had always been a symbol of hope for the Mexican people, this El Munstro works for his thug father-in-law named Teddy who meddles in underage prostitution and organ harvesting. Crystal is a recovering addict. She struggles with running her motel while also trying to keep her alcoholic husband alive, with Teddy’s help. Keith is Teddy’s accountant who picks up his best friend, Randy, from jail. Except Randy walks out of the prison doors with a giant swastika covering his face. These people don’t have much in common, but their worlds are about to collide.

This is director Ryan Prows’ first feature film, which he cowrote. The film was also written by Tim Cairo, Jake Gibson, Shaye Ogbonna, and Maxwell Michael Towson (Towson being the only one to have written a feature length film before). Lowlife is broken into different sections, allowing you to get to know each of the main characters. The segments are titles “Monsters,” “Fiends,” and “Thugs.” People will immediately be reminded of Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction, mostly due to the way the film is broken into separate subplots that all intertwine. While that connection is justifiable, Lowlife seems to take that concept and perfect it. The individual stories for each character feel complete, and with each segment more and more is revealed. The filmmakers designed it so the audience can understand more about what is happening with each segment, while also showing what is happening from different points of view. When the different subplots finally come together, it makes the climax of the film all the more intense and enthralling.

What pushes this film beyond being a typical suspenseful (sometimes comedic) drama with a bunch of unsavory characters is how much heart this film has. For the most part, all of the characters are truly horrible people. Yet, somehow, the filmmakers still make you care about what happens to them. The character arcs also show some interesting changes and growth from beginning to end that isn’t normally seen from these types of characters. There are also so many layers, not only to the plot but also to each character, that show no one is perfect. Each individual just tries to live their life the best they know how to.

The multidimensional characters would not have been as fascinating without the work of some fantastic actors. Ricardo Adam Zarate (Deadly Films) makes his feature film debut as El Munstro. This character speaks entirely in Spanish and is never seen without his luchador mask on. Zarate perfectly portrays how El Munstro straddles the line of being the noble fighter he believes he is, and the somewhat unstable madman he truly is. The way Zarate is able to emote through the luchador mask is also outstanding. Nicki Micheaux (The Shield, Animal Kingdom) shines as motel owner Crystal. Micheaux’s performance stands out because she brings the most heart and emotion of all the characters. It is impossible to watch her performance and not feel a strong sense of empathy for Crystal. Jon Oswald (Mata Hari, Boomerang Kids) plays the now ex-convict Randy. As soon as Randy appears on the screen with a swastika on his face, audiences will expect to hate him. Surprisingly, the writing combined with Oswald’s performance make Randy the most enjoyable character. He is funny without trying to be, and he is probably the only one of the characters who could be considered a wholly good person, despite what his appearance would suggest. Finally, there is the character Teddy, played by Mark Burnham (Wrong Cops, Hidden in the Woods). Burnham’s look in the film at first seems over-the-top, but his performance of the despicable and soulless Teddy brings all the flash and color back to earth. All of these actors, as well as one not mentioned here, will make you remember this film.

This is not a horror film, yet I am still writing this review for it. It may defy being placed in any one genre, but I would say it is mostly a thrilling crime drama with comedic elements. After watching this film at the International Horror and Sci-fi Film Festival, it was clear to me that I couldn’t see it without spreading the word about it. Lowlife gives a riveting snapshot into a world filled with criminals, yet it chooses to focus on the good within that deranged world. It weaves through multiple different plot lines, then sews them together seamlessly by the end of the film. The entire cast is outstanding, the writing is phenomenal, and it is incredibly well directed. If the fact that I wrote a review for this film on my horror site doesn’t make it explicit enough, let me make it more clear: go see this film.

OVERALL RATING: 9/10

Rock Steady Row

rocksteady

In the not so distant future, college campuses become survival of the fittest. Two warring fraternities have taken over Rock Steady University campus leaving the rest of the student body to fend for themselves. On his first day of college, Leroy’s bike is stolen by one of the fraternities. Leroy attempts to get his bike back leading to fights, conspiracies, and a very strange freshman year.

This film is very difficult to fit into a specific genre. There are both dramatic and comedic elements, and at times there is action. An argument could be made that it is post-apocalyptic, and the film even feels like watching a video game in certain scenes. The film is definitely a hodge-podge of many different genres all rolled into one, and that is part of its charm. This is the first feature film directed by Trevor Stevens and written by Bomani Story. The pair took a simple concept, a freshman’s bike being stolen on campus, and turned it into an epic tale. While the universe created in the film is an extreme caricature of the real world, it is still something relatable and accessible to any viewer who spent time going to college. The plot simultaneously makes fun of fraternities, points out the capitalist habits of many universities, and shows that it often takes more than just intelligence to get a higher education.

The cast features many caricatures of people you likely encountered in college. Heston Horwin (Run, Speechless) plays freshman Leroy. In a way he is a typical college freshman, completely self absorbed and only concerned with himself and his bike. As his arc progresses, Horwin brings more heart to the character. Leroy goes through some fairly elaborate schemes to get his bike back, and watching Horwin portray this character through all his trials and tribulations is quite entertaining. Two of the most fun characters to watch throughout the film are the two fraternity leaders, Andrew Palmer and Augustus Washington III. Andrew is played by Logan Huffman (Final Girl, Lymelife). Huffman plays the caricature of the ultimate bro frat boy who thinks he can get whatever, and whoever he wants.  He is everything a person could hate in a frat boy, and Huffman plays Andrew so well he will make you laugh while your skin is crawling. Augustus is played by Isaac Alisma (Ready Set Blahe, The Arabian Warrior). Augustus is a different type of frat boy. He is the leader of the intelligent, borderline geeky, but still hip and cool frat. Alisma does a great job of making it unclear who Augustus is loyal too, although it is no secret that his own fraternity is always number one. Diamond White (Boo! A Madea Halloween, F*&% the Prom) plays Piper. We all know that person on college campus who is the perpetual activist, trying to expose the truth and make the campus a better place. Piper is that person in Rock Steady Row. White portrays Piper in a way that makes her straddle the edge of being too perfect, but she is still the most grounded and heart-filled character of the bunch. All of these actors and characters work well together on camera, making for scenes that run the gambit of emotions for the audience.

Of all the films I saw at the International Horror and Sci-fi Film Festival, this was probably the one with the most unique visuals. The film start with a fun animated back story, allowing the audience to get to know this somewhat futuristic world they are about to witness. From there the film focuses on a lot of really fascinating uses of color and light. Most of the color pallet is desolate beiges, greys, and other muted colors. Only the frat brothers wear bright colors; red for Andrew and his frat brothers, blue for Augustus and his frat brothers. When Leroy is traveling back and forth, trying to find a way to get his beloved bike back, the “travel” is shown by backlighting Leroy on a sound stage so all you see is his silhouette and whatever color is being projected in the lights. These scenes are where audiences will really get a sense of the video game and comic book style of the film. The film is really stunning to watch and  feels somewhat reminiscent of films like Turbo Kid and Scott Pilgrim vs. The World, but with its own unique flare.

Rock Steady Row is a film that defies definition, as well as expectations. Its a genre bending tale that will surely become a cult classic, especially with the unique imagery and storytelling style. The fact that there are so many different genres thrown into this melting pot can be a bit overwhelming, especially since there are so many different styles going on throughout the film. This means the film won’t be for everyone, but it is hard to deny how much fun this film is. It is sure to win the hearts of many cinephiles because of its unique content and style.

OVERALL RATING: 7.5/10

Downrange

downrange

A group of friends, acquaintances, and strangers carpool together on a road trip. While in the middle of nowhere they get a flat tire. The group soon realizes the tire was shot. There is someone hidden nearby, and he wants to take them out one by one. With no other people in the area, and no cell reception, the group is stranded. They will have to fight and do whatever it takes to survive.

This film has a simple and effective premise. It also feels very timely considering recent events happening in the United States. A lone shooter is well hidden from a vantage point, and there is nothing anyone can do about it. This is something that has been in the news a lot lately; the idea that there could be a shooter anywhere at any time is a fear many people experience these days. The realism of the premise makes the plot all the more intense to watch. However, there is one thing that takes away from the realism of this film: the gun. This is an issue in many films, but there is a lot of inconsistency when it comes to the gun used and how many bullets it can shoot. The gun is described as an antique, and when shown up close it appears that only a single round can be loaded at a time. Yet, there are scenes where multiple shots are fired without the man reloading his gun. This is a common flaw in film, especially action films. It is a detail many viewers will likely be able to ignore, but it took me out of the otherwise realistic plot.

What makes this premise stand out from similar plots is that the group aren’t necessarily friends. There is a couple in the mix, but everyone else just met in order to do a group carpool. We don’t know where each person is going, and no one knows anyone else’s background. That anonymity makes the dynamics between the group very interesting. It also adds an extra layer of intensity because each character doesn’t know how the other will react, especially in a situation like this where anxiety is at an all time high. In films where a group of friends are attacked, one can assume the friends will do whatever they can to save each other; when it is strangers, you never know what will happen.

The performances in this film start out a bit rough, but each character seems to get their groove as the film continues. Kelly Connaire (For Art’s Sake) plays the timid Jodi. In the beginning Jodi seems like a weak side character, but as the film progresses Connaire makes Jodi stronger and more interesting. Stephanie Pearson (Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, Insidious: Chapter 2) plays the most industrious of the group, Keren. Pearson gives the strongest and most consistent performance of the group, and she often is the one keeping the plot exciting. The dynamic between these two characters is also interesting because they are two opposite personalities. Witnessing how they react with each new horrific situation makes for a compelling juxtaposition.

There are a few aspects of the film that don’t quite translate. One of those things is the humor. There are scenes where half the audience will laugh, and the other half will find those scenes to be quite serious. Without speaking to writer Joey O’Bryan (Fulltime Killer) and writer/director Ryûhei Kitamura (The Midnight Meat Train), there is no way to know if parts of the film were meant to be humorous or not. Another aspect of the film that doesn’t translate, and could potentially relate to humor as well, is the practical effects. The gore is fun and brightly colored, which many horror gore fans will love. Unfortunately, there is one practical effects gimmick used twice in the film that doesn’t quite fit. First, it seems odd to use such a specific gimmick twice in a short amount of time. Second, the effect looks cool, but it doesn’t seem very anatomically realistic with how the injury happened. Luckily this happens earlier in the film, and likely has a hand in why the film gets better the further into the plot it goes.

Downrange is a thrill ride playing into audiences’ fears over current events. The film takes a while to to get into a rhythm, but once it does it is exciting, gory, and filled with a couple fun twists and turns. There are parts where the potential for humor is a bit muddled, and many people will likely not find the film humorous at all. This film will likely be viewed very differently depending on who watches the film, but that may also be one of its charms. This may not be Kitamura’s best work, but it is still highly entertaining.

OVERALL RATING: 6/10

IHSFF 2018: An Interview With Festival Director Monte Yazzie

IHSFF+slide

The International Horror and Sci-fi Film Festival, which shows in conjunction with the Phoenix Film Festival, is entering it’s 14th year. The festival has made a name for itself as the film event of the year for horror fans in Arizona. It gives audiences the chance to be among the first to see great horror film, and see some indie horror flicks they might not see otherwise. The festival director, Monte Yazzie, was nice enough to answer some questions about the festival for us. Here is what he had to say:

How long have you been the director of the IHSFF?

I have been the Festival Director for 4 years.

What is your favorite part of putting together the festival?

I love the puzzle of finding films to program. With more avenues for filmmakers to showcase their work and the access to filmmaking technology becoming so readily available, there are new artists emerging with unique voices and visions to share. Working to find that good balance of horror and science fiction is challenging in a good way.

But what I think I’m most fond about is the inclusion of our filmmakers. Being able to play a small part in bringing their films to an audience is a special thing. Watching the audience connect with their films and seeing the filmmaker experience that feeling is an absolute treasure.

Over the years have you changed the types of films you select, or does it depend on the submissions?

We get so many submissions every year and it continues to grow. Every year the genre experiences change, what is popular one year isn’t popular the next. The programming team understands this and we always strive to pick the best films from the bunch regardless of what topic it wants to cover.

Festivalgoers probably noticed that the PFF/IHSFF has a longer run this year. Why is that? What are some other changes festivalgoers can expect?

We have expanded to 11 days…that’s awesome! The expansion was necessary, we never stop growing and continue to get more excellent films every year. We want to provide as much festival to the film fan as we can.

IHSFF has an entire emphasis during the second weekend with two dedicated screens!!! We have an opportunity to program more movies and allow for festival goers to catch everything that we have on the list. It’s an huge step for us.

What is a piece of advice you can give someone coming to the festival for the first time this year?

Have fun. The Phoenix Film Festival and International Horror and Sci-Fi Film Festival has a combined 300 films to showcase. Go to our website www.horrorscifi.com and take a look at the festival program, start figuring out the films that you want to watch, and get tickets early. We always sell out of bigger films, it’s important to make sure you get your tickets early so that you get into the theater. Recline back (yes, our theater has reclining seats), get some popcorn and a beverage, and enjoy the sights we have to show you!!!


 

The IHSFF and PFF will be running from April 5th through April 15th at the Harkins Scottsdale 101. Along with the link Monte provided, you can view the entire film schedule for both festivals here. I hope to see you there!