Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil, and Vile

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In the 1970’s the world watched as Ted Bundy went on trial for horrific crimes. Throughout much of this time he was supported by his longtime girlfriend, Liz. As Bundy went on trial for increasingly terrible crimes, Liz struggled with whether or not she believed his innocence. While we all know how the trail ended, many may not know Liz’s story.

Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil, and Vile is a film adapted from Elizabeth Kendall’s autobiography titled The Phantom Prince: My Life with Ted Bundy. The film was adapted for the screen by screenwriter Michael Werwie in his feature film debut and directed by Joe Berlinger. Berlinger has a long history of working on projects related to true crime such as Conversations with a Killer: The Ted Bundy Tapes and Unspeakable Crime: The Killing of Jessica Chambers. Leading up to this, his work has been primarily documentaries rather than narrative film. 

Going into the film I wasn’t as well versed in Ted Bundy as other true crime buffs. I knew in general what he did and that he had killed many women. The film begins with Liz visiting Bundy one last time in prison. From there their history is recounted from the moment the two met. As expected, for much of the film Bundy is perceived as a handsome, charming, loving man. This will likely bother some viewers, but it is important to remember that this is how the media saw him for much of the trial, and this is why he was able to repeatedly commit unspeakable crimes. His good looks, charisma, and charm disarmed people and made it easier for him to operate as a serial killer for so long. The filmmakers chose to primarily focus on the trials starting with Bundy’s arrest in Utah, leading up to his final trial in Florida.

While Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil, and Vile does a great job of showing how charming Bundy could be and the process of the legal proceedings, it lacks any real depth. The book was written by Liz, so it includes much of her story as well, but this gets lost a bit in the film. The audience gets a glimpse into how Liz initially believed he was innocent. It even glosses over how she turned to alcoholism as the trials went on and caused her more emotional turmoil. When it comes to Bundy himself, for the most part, he is shown as the charming man Liz likely fell in love with. There are only a few moments where his true nature shows through, but it doesn’t feel like enough to show the monster he truly was. With all of these aspects the filmmakers only touch the surface, leaving the film somewhat devoid of any real drama.

The strongest aspect of Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil, and Vile is the performances. Even simply by watching the trailer it is clear to see that Zac Efron (Neighbors, The Greatest Showman) is a perfect casting choice as Ted Bundy. Not only does he have a shocking resemblance to the real Bundy, but he plays the balance of charming and unsettling quite well. As I said before, throughout most of the film Bundy is only shown as the man women all over the country watched on TV and strangely fell in love with. Yet, there are a few moments when that facade breaks and Efron allows the audience to see the man behind the charisma. Lily Collins (The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones, Mirror Mirror) plays Liz. While I wish the film had gone deeper into her story, Collins still portrays Liz well. The internal struggle she goes through reads all over her face as it becomes more and more difficult to believe Bundy is innocent. The chemistry between the two actors makes their relationship interesting to watch, but it also makes it a bit too easy to forget the monster the film is about.

Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil, and Vile is filled with highs and lows that ultimately keep it from being a great film. The obvious highlight is the performance from Efron as Ted Bundy. The biggest issue holding the film back is likely Berlinger’s background making true crime documentaries. Watching the film, it ends up coming across more as a courtroom reenactment. Fans of true crime and thrillers will likely enjoy Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil, and Vilebut it lacks the depth to be a memorable film.

OVERALL RATING: 6/10

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