Greg Nicotero

Creepshow: Season 1 Episode 2

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After a successful first episode, it’s time for episode two of Shudder’s hit new series, Creepshow. This week features two tales that lean more towards the comedic side compared to what fans saw in episode one. The two stories told in this episode are “Bad Wolf Down” and “The Finger.” These are two very different tales, but each one is sure to deliver the laughs.

The episode starts with “Bad Wolf Down.” This segment is written and directed by Rob Schrab (Monster House, The Sarah Silverman Program). The plot follows a small band of American soldiers fighting Nazis in France during WWII. They are forced to retreat and take shelter in a small building that once served as the jail for the remote area. Inside the men find a French woman locked inside the jail cell. Yet this woman isn’t as helpless as she appears.

“Bad Wolf Down” definitely takes the audience back to 80’s b-horror films with clunky dialogue, overacting, and somewhat laughable practical effects. This is clearly a deliberate choice made by Schrab. It is an intentional cheesiness that creates a hilarious throwback for horror fans. The most humorous aspect is the dialogue. Much of what the soldiers say to each other is so over the top and stereotypical of what you might expect soldiers to say to each other. It’s almost impossible not to laugh.

Of all the actors in this segment, horror fans will immediately recognize Jeffrey Combs (Re-Animator, From Beyond) as the vengeful Nazi commander, Reinhard. Combs is a gem and a great comedic actor, which leads me to believe his absolutely atrocious German accent is another purposeful choice to add to the humor. The other standout performances come from Dave MacDonald (Stranger Things, Doom Patrol) as Captain Talby, Scott “Kid Cudi” Miscudi (Need For Speed, Two Night Stand) as Doc Kessler, and Callan Wilson (A Mermaid’s Tale, All Hallow’s Evil: Lord of the Harvest) as Pvt. Rivers.

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So far, “Bad Wolf Down” has utilized the comic book style that normally bookends the stories more than any other segment. Some of this is more subtle, like including the blue and red backlighting fans will likely recognize from the first Creepshow film. Since this is a werewolf story, there is naturally a scene where the viewer is shown people transforming from a person to a wolf. Schrab and team wisely used the comic book style to show the transformation in an animated comic panel rather than blowing the budget on practical effects. It looks great, is smart and unique, plus it adds to the humor. The werewolves themselves are also a bit on the cheesy side, but each wolf has a really fun and individual look to them.

From there our beloved creep flips open a new comic for the second segment. This one is titled “The Finger.” Written by David J. Schow (The Crow, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre [2006]) and directed by Greg Nicotero (The Walking Dead), the story introduces viewers to a man named Clark. Clark likes to collect things other people would likely consider garbage. One day he finds a weird, shriveled up finger. He takes it home and realizes it is growing; first an arm, then an entire body. He names the strange creature Bob and cares for it, but Bob has a murderous way of showing his affection.

This is an absolutely laugh out loud story. “The Finger” stars DJ Qualls (Supernatural, The Core) as Clark. Clark is kind of a loner, so when Bob comes into his life he’s happy to care for the strange creature. Qualls’ performance is hysterical for two main reasons. First, he often breaks the fourth wall to talk directly to the audience, giving amusing commentary and summarizing events to save time. Second, he reacts to the bloody things Bob does the same way someone might react to their cat being annoying or bringing him a dead mouse. It is entirely relatable, but taken to such an unbelievable extreme it is sure to make viewers crack up.

“The Finger” also includes amazing practical effects. From the lone finger to the body that eventually grows out of it, Bob is a gross and creepy little creature that you also want to cuddle because he’s so cute. It is great creature design that fans are sure to remember as the series continues. On top of that, the little presents Bob brings home for Clark are also very well done. The entire episode is filled with fantastic practical effects, as one would expect in something directed by Nicotero.

Episode two of Shudder’s Creepshow took the series in a much more humorous direction. Both “Bad Wolf Down” and “The Finger” deliver laughs, although they are very different types of humor. On top of that, the performances are highly entertaining and the practical effects are delightful, even the somewhat hokier werewolves of “Bad Wolf Down.” Just like the first episode, be sure to look for the hidden Easter eggs in episode two, including a special quick cameo in “The Finger.”

The second episode of Creepshow will be available to stream on Shudder on Thursday, October 3rd. You can also watch it live on the Shudder channel at 9pm EST/6pm PST the same night.

Creepshow: Season 1 Episode 1

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In 1982, the iconic horror anthology, Creepshow, was released. The anthology was written by Stephen King and directed by George A. Romero, who are both horror icons. The film spawned a sequel in 1987. Now, Creepshow is back in an exciting new way.

The horror streaming service, Shudder, is bringing back everyone’s favorite creep with his chest of comics and all new stories. Creepshow is getting a new life in the form of a weekly series. Every Thursday night Shudder subscribers can tune in to watch the latest episode live and the episode will also become available ondemand. Each episode will tell two different stories and each week fans will get to see work from some of their favorite actors, writers, and directors while also being introduced to some exciting new talent. The lovely folks over at Shudder were kind enough to give me an early look at the first episode. In this episode viewers will see two thrilling tales, “Gray Matter” and “The House of the Head.”

“Gray Matter,” based on a short story by legendary author Stephen King and adapted for the screen by Byron Willinger (The Commuter) and Philip de Blasi (The Commuter), starts off the episode with a bang. Directed by Greg Nicotero (The Walking Dead), the segment tells the tale of a father and son. After losing his wife, the father turns to alcohol to ease his pain with horrifying consequences. The story takes place on one dark and stormy night as most of the town has either left to avoid the storm or boarded everything up. This generates a claustrophobic feeling of being trapped as things gradually go from bad to worse.

This short was a great way to kick off the first episode. It is a frightening story that all culminates in fantastic practical effects that you have to see to believe. “Gray Matter” also includes a couple of fan favorite horror actors including Adrienne Barbeau (The Fog, Escape From New York) and Tobin Bell (Saw, Belzebuth). This segment also stars relative newcomer, Christopher Nathan (Barely Lethal, The Spectacular Now) as Timmy. Nathan delivers a compelling performance as he struggles between doing the right thing and his love for his father.

The second segment, “The House of the Head,” takes creepy dolls to a whole new level. This story follows young Evie as she plays with her doll family in their beautiful dollhouse. When a mysterious toy head appears in the house the lives of the doll family are threatened. “The House of the Head” is written by Josh Malerman, who also wrote the Bird Box novel, and directed by John Harrison (Tales From the Darkside: The Movie, Book of Blood).

This story is particularly frightening. The viewer sees the lives of the dolls through the eyes of young Evie. This is a highly effective storytelling tool because there is really no major action, we don’t ever even see the dolls move. It is Evie’s love of her dolls and childish point of view that allows the sense of danger to the dolls to come through the screen. Evie is played by the very talented Cailey Flemming (The Walking Dead, Peppermint). Flemming really makes the plot work. If it wasn’t for her love of the dolls and her ability to treat them as if they were real people, then the viewer wouldn’t care about the dolls and feel the peril they are in.

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Shudder and the entire team behind the new Creepshow series got the show off to a strong start with “Grey Matter” and “The House of the Head.” Both stories boast strong performances, beloved horror actors, favorite horror writers and directors, stunning practical effects, and chilling tales that are sure to give you goose bumps. Even more appealing is how both segments do what I always want to see from short films: they tell a complete story, but leave enough mystery to make you want more. It makes me excited to see what the future episodes will hold. I also love that Shudder is only releasing one episode a week, allowing for the collective live viewing experience that has been lost with many streaming services. With the success of the weekly episodes of The Last Drive-In with Joe Bob Briggs, I can only imagine how many Shudder subscribers will watch live and tweet along with the show.

The first episode of Creepshow will air on Thursday, September 26th at 9pm EST/6pm PST. If you aren’t a Shudder subscriber yet, be sure to sign up so you can be part of this fantastic weekly horror event.