zombie

Yummy

In a secluded Eastern European hospital, a woman goes to get breast reduction surgery while her mother is getting more work done to look younger. While they are prepped for surgery, the woman’s boyfriend accidentally stumbles upon something he shouldn’t have, unleashing a nightmarish zombie outbreak inside the hospital walls.

This zombie gore-fest hails all the way from Belgium. Lars Damoiseaux (10 jaar leuven kort, Undercover) directed and co-wrote the film along with Eveline Hagenbeek (Undercover, Rokjesdag). Yummy takes humorous jabs at plastic surgery and the lengths people will go to feel young and beautiful, while also delivering copious amounts of blood and guts. When we are introduced to the young woman, her mother, and her boyfriend, it creates an interesting dynamic. This is especially evident with mother and daughter. The daughter has the “God given gift” of very large natural breasts, but she hates the attention they bring her so she wants breast reduction. The mother, on the other hand, has already had multiple procedures to look younger and comes to the hospital wanting more. While both sides represent being unhappy with who you are and the way you look, the mother is the more traditional view of plastic surgery most viewers will think of. The film creates a kind of “be careful what you wish for” scenario as the doctors accidentally created the zombie virus in their quest to unlock the secrets of eternal youth. It sends a strong message, but it also allows the filmmakers to inject quite a few laugh-out-loud moments.

While for the most part Yummy delivers lots of fun along with the carnage, there are some drawbacks. There are one or two scenes that lean a bit too far into the realm of distasteful humor. It’s clear they want to push the envelope, especially with some of the effects, but it ends up bordering on offensive. That being said, most of the practical effects throughout Yummy are very well done. There are a lot of terrifying and gruesome zombies in this film and each one looks fantastic. In a few scenes there are practical effects to replicate cosmetic surgery or other aspects of the human body and those are also quite realistic. The film even has a great score, although during one scene it sounds very similar to the score from 28 Days Later.

There are many great performances in Yummy, but three stand out. The first is Maaike Neuville (De Dag, Clan) as Alison. What really stands out about Neuville’s performance is how she conveys being uncomfortable with her own body. Alison doesn’t want the attention her breasts give her, and the attention most women at the clinic desire, and Neuville excels at showing us that. Bart Hollander (Salamander, Callboys) plays Alison’s boyfriend, Michael. Michael is like a big, maybe slightly pathetic puppy dog; he’s goofy and hates the sight of blood, but he clearly adores Alison. Hollander plays this role well, especially when his many attempts to be the hero don’t quite work out. Then there is Benjamin Ramon (Carnival, Toxic Anyway) as hospital employee Daniel. Ramon does a fantastic job of being incredibly sleazy in one moment, then completely sweet in the next, depending on who he’s interacting with. These three actors also play off of each other very well.

Yummy is a zombie cautionary tale about the consequences of trying to look young forever. Damoiseaux and Hagenbeek definitely create a film that is as funny as it is grotesque. Gore hounds will be delighted with how drenched in blood and guts Yummy is from start to finish. There may be a couple of distasteful moments and a mildly lackluster ending, but it is sure to entertain viewers. The performances and cosmetic surgery hospital backdrop help to make this zombie film stand alongside others of its kind, even if it doesn’t stand above them. And because in this day and age some people still refuse to watch a film with subtitles, I will let potential viewers know that it’s about 50/50 English vs subtitles. If you’re looking for mindless fun, then this is definitely a great choice.

OVERALL RATING: 6/10

Blood Quantum

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In the early 80’s a zombie virus sweeps the country. Humans, and even some animals, are infected and turned into the walking dead. Yet the people of an isolated Mi’gMaq reserve of Red Crow appear to be immune. Now they must battle the undead while also battling whether or not they should let the white survivors into the reservation.

Jeff Barnaby (Rhymes for Young Ghouls) brings audiences his sophomore feature film as writer, director, and editor of Blood Quantum. The film tackles issues of colonialism in a modern way, allowing horror to act both as a metaphor and as a way to emphasize the message. Blood Quantum opens with a bang, then takes some time establishing the characters living on the reservation. From the beginning it’s clear there is resentment between family members as well as tensions between those on the reservation and those in town. The ensuing chaos of the virus and realization that the Mi’gMaq seems to be immune only exacerbate these deep-rooted issues. There is a constant fear of who you can trust, whether they are from the reservation or not, that ultimately leads to the final confrontation. It allows the film to be suspenseful and gory. Although, there are a few calm, still moments that slow the momentum of the plot a bit too much.

What I love about Blood Quantum is that it’s the kind of film that includes hidden meanings and details specific to indigenous people. There are things I could never fully grasp as a white woman, yet immersing the story in the horror genre allows it to be consumed by a wider audience. It also allows for a learning experience. Much like the subtle nods to various racial issues in Jordan Peele’s Get Out, Barnaby forces non-indigenous audiences to learn something from the film. A great example is simply the title of the film, Blood Quantum. After seeing the film, I learned this term refers to a controversial measurement that determines how much indigenous blood you have and whether or not you can become a citizen of a specific tribe. I can only imagine there are other details that went over my head that only add to the metaphors of the film.

Blood Quantum has stunning performances that bring the plot to life. The three stars of the film are a father and his two sons. They represent different points of view on colonialism and interacting with white people. Traylor, the father, is played by Michael Greyeyes (Fear the Walking Dead, True Detective). Greyeyes has a very commanding presence on screen, and his portrayal of Traylor conveys a lot of wisdom. This wisdom shows a wariness towards white people, but also a diplomacy that comes from his position as sheriff where he can easily work with them when needed. Traylor represents the middle ground while his two sons, who are half-brothers, are polar opposites of one other. Kiowa Gordon (The Twilight Saga: Eclipse, The Red Road) plays Traylor’s older son, Lysol. Lysol feels deep-seeded resentment for his father, as well as the white people who live in town. Gordon does a fantastic job of showing the anger build in Lysol throughout the film until it boils over at both the white people on the reservation and his own family. Then there is the youngest son, Joseph, played by Forrest Goodluck (The Revenant, The Miseducation of Cameron Post). Joseph is by far the most hopeful of this trio. Goodluck makes it clear to viewers that Joseph is a caring individual who wants to bring survivors together, whether they are Mi’gMaq or white. All three leads are wonderful on screen, and they create such a fascinating comparison with their different points of view.

The various artistic elements of Blood Quantum add to its overall appeal. The most immediate thing horror fans will notice is the stunning makeup for the zombies and the grotesquely realistic practical effects. There are multiple memorable zombie kills and gory moments that are sure to stick with viewers. To bring the film together, Barnaby and Joe Barrucco (Rhymes for Young Ghouls, Appiness) composed a haunting musical score. It manages to encompass an 80’s synth sound alongside more traditional indigenous sounds. Blood Quantum even includes striking animated scenes that create absolutely gorgeous visuals emphasizing dire events. One thing that seems odd is that the film takes place in 1981. While the clothes, cars, and lack of technology such as cell phones makes it easy to believe the film takes place in the past, it is also unnecessary. The area where the reservation is located is fairly remote, which stands to reason cell phones wouldn’t have great reception. Plus, the plot moves into the apocalypse quickly enough that the lack of technology would barely be noticed. Blood Quantum ends up with a timelessness where, if you didn’t know when it took place, it could easily take place in 1981 or 2020.

Blood Quantum masterfully delivers a social commentary on colonialism in the context of a zombie apocalypse. Barnaby clearly cares about the topic of his film and made sure to bring to life what he wanted by writing, directing, editing, and even co-composing the film. It includes captivating performances from the three male leads and remarkable visuals ranging from extreme gore to gorgeous animation. I won’t pretend I understand all of the various themes discussed. This is the kind of film that likely gets better with each subsequent viewing, particularly if you’re willing to do the research on what inspired these themes.

OVERALL RATING: 7/10

The Last Ones

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A deadly virus has wiped out most of the population. John and Michael have been surviving together since the beginning, finding food and avoiding the creatures that come at night. After months with no sign of another living human, the appearance of a young woman tests their friendship. It soon becomes clear not everything is as it seems.

The Last Ones (previously titled Last Days) is the feature-film debut of writer and director Andrew Jara. At first glance, this film seems like just another zombie apocalypse film. The film opens with John desperately trying to find his family with very unfortunate results. He is left alone in this post-pandemic world with his friend, Michael. The eventually find a daily routine as the months go by with no other living humans to be seen. Yet at night Michael guard their home from the living dead who sometimes stalk the area. Then John runs into a mysterious woman, Karina. Her presence changes the course of the film, bringing some interesting  and unexpected elements into the plot.

In general, the plot is a very interesting one. There are some various twists and turns that deliver something audiences might not expect. Watching The Last Ones, horror fans will likely feel an influence of George A. Romero’s Night of the Living Dead. It is a slow burn of a film that gradually builds tension. Like Romero’s work, the plot also focuses much more on the tumultuous relationships between people rather than the undead threat outside. This shows a lot of promise for Jara’s future work.

Yet there are some elements of the film that don’t work quite as well. The beginning of The Last Ones is a bit rough at times. Some of the dialogue is a bit clunky and forced as it attempts to give the audience a bit of exposition. This feeling of clunkiness unfortunately isn’t help much by the performances. Mark Ocegueda plays John in his feature-film debut. His delivery of the dialogue is a bit awkward and void of emotion, but the dialogue and his delivery gradually improves as the film progresses. Marcelle Bowman (The Virus, Refuge) plays Karina. Her performance is adequate and also seems to improve throughout the film. The highlight performance in the film comes from Algernon D’Ammassa (Doc, The Cellar Door) as Michael. Some of his dialogue also feels a bit forced, but D’Ammassa does a great job of conveying an underlying menacing feeling about him.

Along with the overall plot of The Last Ones, the look of the film also appears to be an homage to Night of the Living Dead. The most obvious visual choice that hints to that is the fact that the film is entirely in black and white. This nod to Romero is also a wise decision as a micro-budget horror film. It allows the filmmaker to create the illusion of blood and gore without having to spend too much on practical or CGI effects. There is some minimal prosthetic makeup for the undead that realistically might not be that visually appealing, but the black and white masks it and makes the effects passable. One aspect that surprised me is the well-crafted musical score by Jordon Schranz.

The Last Ones is a classic zombie film with a twist that has its shortcomings, but still shows promise. Considering it is a micro-budget horror film and the first feature film by Jara, it is surprisingly well done. The film gets off to a rough start, from the dialogue to the performances, but gradually improve as the tension build. D’Ammassa is sure to stand out in viewers’ minds as a memorable performance. From the unique take on the zombie subgenre of horror to the homage to Romero, this imperfect film is still worth a watch. It holds my interest enough to make me curious what Jara will do next.

OVERALL RATING: 4/10

Resident Evil: The Final Chapter

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The human race is facing extinction. The only one who can save the last remnants of humanity is Alice. She must venture back to where it all began, Racoon City. There she will have to fight in order to end the plague of undead and bring humans back to the top of the food chain. Time is running out. Will Alice be able to defeat the hordes of zombies as well as some of the most powerful foes she has ever faced?

Before I begin, I have to address the elephant in the room. For those who know and love the Resident Evil franchise, you must be familiar with the origin story of Umbrella Corporation and the T-virus. In the second film, Resident Evil: Apocalypse, we meet Dr. Ashwood who created the T-Virus to save his daughter, Angela, from a degenerative disease. The film even spends quite a bit of time on Alice and company trying to rescue Angela. Now, in Resident Evil: The Final Chapter, the origin story has completely changed. It is still a father who is trying to save his daughter from a rare disease, but the names and time frame have been altered. Even the disease affecting the daughter is different than what we learned in the second film. While I prefer origin story in this film to what we saw in Apocalypse, it seems insane that the filmmakers would make this film as if the second one didn’t exist. Did they expect fans not to notice? That, and the addition of a strange biblical aspect to Dr. Isaacs’ motivation (which was never mentioned in the previous films), left me with a bad taste in my mouth.

Now that I’ve gotten that off my chest, we can get into the rest of the film. I love the Resident Evil franchise. The first three films are fantastic. The fourth film is a little all over the place, but still a fun story with lots of excitement. The franchise lost me a little bit once the fifth film, Resident Evil: Retribution, came out. That installment didn’t really have a clear story line, virtually no character development for the new characters, and it felt more like a video game than a film. The Final Chapter started out feeling more like Retribution. I don’t even remember if there was any real dialogue in the first twenty minutes of the film. Aside from learning the new origin story of the T-virus, the beginning was primarily filled with random scenes of Alice fighting the undead and a giant flying creature. Once we got past that and learned Alice’s new mission the story began to take shape. It’s a simple story with a clear goal in mind, but it was filled with action, excitement, and intrigue. The only other issue I encountered with regards to the plot was yet another problem that was also present in Retribution. There was little to no character development with regards to the new group of survivors Alice encounters. Much like in Retribution, the new characters are really only in the film to act as cannon fodder and to make Alice (and the audience) sad when a human dies. It is difficult to feel anything when a character dies if all you really know about them is their name.

When it comes to the acting we all know and love Milla Jovovich (Resident Evil, The Fifth Element) as Alice. Jovovich gave another convincing performance as the constant warrior and martyr of humanity. The real standout performance was that of Iain Glen (Resident Evil: Extinction, Game of Thrones) as Dr. Isaacs. Glen played such an amazing villain. Not only did Glen portray Dr. Isaacs as a man who believes he is righteous in the path he has chosen, but he also showed the audience the doctor’s complete lack of conscious. I was ecstatic the filmmakers brought him back as the ultimate evil for Alice to face at the end of the franchise.

The CGI effects in the Resident Evil films always impress me. They are able to create unique monsters, futuristic technology, and entire cityscapes without it looking laughable. The creature design in this film was very fun. They clearly chose to go bigger and more unique for a lot of the T-virus monsters which added to the scares and thrills. Even the large CGI zombie hordes looked well done. While I knew the things on the screen were all done by computers, there was never a moment where I was consciously thinking that it was computer generated or that it was done poorly.

Resident Evil: The Final Chapter was a fitting end to the franchise filled with action, intrigue, and of course zombies. Sadly it is a flawed film, primarily due to the sudden change in origin stories and the lack of character development. As I said earlier, I preferred the origin story created in The Final Chapter. It made for a more impactful story and a more powerful ending. I just can’t ignore that we were already given the origin story, although it seemed like that was exactly what the filmmakers wanted the audience to do. If you haven’t seen Resident Evil: Apocalypse, then don’t see it before watching The Final Chapter. It sounds odd, but you will likely enjoy the film more by avoiding the conflicting origins of the T-virus. If you have seen Apocalypse, I will warn you that you may leave the theater a bit frustrated by the last film of the Resident Evil franchise.

OVERALL RATING: 5.5/10

Train to Busan

A father who works too much barely knows or spends time with his daughter. For her birthday all she wants is to go stay with her mother in Busan. The father reluctantly agrees to take her in order to make amends for his lack of presence in her life. Soon after the train leaves the station an infected person spreads a zombie virus throughout the train. The survivors must try to get to a safe station to escape from the zombies on board, as well as to avoid the rapid spread of the virus happening across the country.

Train to Busan is a very well done zombie film. The main thing I look for in a zombie film is not only that it is exciting and gory, but that it shows the truth about human nature. This film does an excellent job of showing that humans are the worst monsters during the zombie outbreak. There is a dynamic group of characters that demonstrate the many sides of human nature. Some sides are good, some are borderline evil. The characters are also very well developed. Especially when looking at the father and daughter, the audience is quickly captivated by their relationship and rooting for them to survive through these horrific events. It is also fascinating to watch their relationship develop, and how the father develops as a person, as they ford their way through the zombie outbreak.

Having a grasp of social issues can’t be the only successful aspect of a great zombie film. There has to be a lot of action as well. As if zombie films aren’t already intense and exciting, this film ramps up the sense of urgency by having the film set on a train. The claustrophobic feeling, coupled with the fear of zombies and infection, makes for an adrenaline filled two hours. The filmmakers decided to go with swift moving zombies, which works well for this film. Fast zombies in an enclosed space definitely makes for some cringe-worthy scenes.

There are so many standout performances in this film that it is hard to narrow down. Since the film focuses primarily on the story of the father and daughter, I will highlight their performances. Yoo Gong (The Age of Shadows) portrays the father, Seok Woo. Not only does Gong do an excellent job, but his character also has one of the more compelling story arcs. With the help of his daughter Seok Woo goes from being an absentee father, to a man who will go through anyone to protect his daughter, to a good person who realizes he must try to save everyone. It is a fascinating and realistic progression that Yoo Gong brings to life. Soo-An Kim (Mad Bad Sad) is phenomenal as the daughter, also named Soo-An. She is clearly the heart of this film and shows the good that can come out of stressful situations. She is meant to shine as the exact opposite of the evil parts of human nature, and Soo-An Kim shows us that in spades. She is another example of the many great child actors that have come out of the woodwork this year.

The look of the zombies in this film is really unsettling (in the best way). The zombies have black veining, their eyes are whited out, and they move in exceedingly creepy ways. The zombies do a lot of jerking movements and arch their backs in inhuman ways. These are also very fast and strong zombies. Once they catch sight of you, you better run. While most of the scenes on the train are of human actors with zombie makeup and contorted bodies, many of the wider shots outside the train utilize CGI. I understand why CGI was used for many of the scenes where hordes of zombies are falling all over each other and falling out of windows. That would take a lot of stunt work and insurance policies to achieve with real actors. It unfortunately also takes away from the realism that is felt throughout most of the film. The CGI made it nearly impossible not to draw a connection to the zombies from World War Z, although I can say that Train to Busan far surpasses that film.

Train to Busan is a thrilling and gory zombie flick with a lot of heart. I’m not afraid to admit that it even made me cry. There are honestly very few things I can say about the film that are negative, aside from the bit of CGI use. It is exciting, scary, intense, bloody, and it brings up the many sides of human nature. The more social/political aspects of the film even feel reminiscent of the older Romero zombie films. It will make you laugh, it will make you cry, it will make you gasp, and it will make you cringe. This is one of the better zombie films of the past decade.

OVERALL RATING: 8.5/10