The Room

The Room

the room

A couple leave their old jobs and home behind to start a new life in a rural fixer upper. Soon after moving in, they find a hidden room. What makes this room special is it will grant you any physical desire. After many wishes, the couple wishes for something most wouldn’t dare. Yet they soon discover that everything has a cost.

Written and directed by Christian Volckman (Renaissance) and co-written by Eric Forestier (La troisième partie du monde), The Room spins an interesting yarn. We meet this couple as they arrive at their new home, having left their jobs and life in the city behind. While working on various repairs to the house, they discover a hidden room. Any physical thing you could want, the room will provide. Money? Clothes? Furniture? It will conjure it for you. Yet we all know everything has a price and a consequence. When the wife impulsively wishes for a baby, it not only puts a strain on their relationship, but it threatens to ruin every aspect of the life they’ve built together.

This film takes a unique yet simple concept and runs with it. It forces the audience to wonder what they would wish for and what they would be willing sacrifice. The plot is very effective, and the filmmakers don’t spend too much time trying to explain how or why the room works this way. There are some minor hints, but for the most part the audience is just made to accept it as the way things are. When the couple wishes for a baby, after the wife has suffered miscarriages, it leads to some very unexpected twists and turns. This is when the plot loses me a bit. It veers into very strange territory that, while very thrilling and suspenseful, is also quite uncomfortable to watch. I would wager that this is the goal of the filmmakers, but it seemed like an unnecessary direction to take.

The two leads in The Room are both fantastic. Olga Kurylenko (Mara, Quantum of Solace) stars as Kate. Kurylenko brings an emotionally charged performance. As Kate we see her go from wariness about the wish-granting room to emotional duress as she tries to hold the frayed pieces of her life together with ill-advised wishes. Her husband, Matt, is played by Kevin Janssens (Revenge, The Ardennes). Matt is a loving husband who wants to provide anything and everything his wife desires. Yet her desires lead to an unexpected place that Matt doesn’t quite know how to handle. Janssens plays a surprisingly warm character who has fits of rage, but his love for his wife is always evident. The pair have amazing on-screen chemistry and convey the subtleties of a committed relationship.

Most of the artistry of The Room involves the production design. The house where the film takes place is stunning. As the couple accumulates more things from their wishes, each room in the house takes on a variety of themes. The entire inside of the house turns into something out of a fairy tale. At one point another world is created within the wish room, which creates a very striking image that plays with the eye a bit. It is the kind of house some might never want to leave.

The Room is a simplistic morality tale that makes audiences wonder what they would do if they could wish for anything physical they desired and what they would be willing to sacrifice to keep it. The filmmakers do a great job of slowly building up the wishes until they become out of control. The house, in a way, is a character itself that drives a wedge between the family unit as it gives them whatever their hearts desire. The performances from both Kurylenko and Janssens are phenomenal and only reaffirm how talented they are. The film veers into a direction that might put off some viewers, but overall it is a well crafted and suspenseful story.

OVERALL RATING: 7/10