Steve Oram

A Dark Song

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Sophia’s young son was kidnapped and murdered. Now she is trying to find a way to contact him. After much research and effort, she rents a house in a secluded part of Wales. Sophia then hires an occultist to come stay with her in the house in order to reach her Guardian Angel. The process involves days, weeks, and even months of meticulous rituals. This process will test them psychologically, and it will even threaten their lives.

Many people wish they could talk to a deceased loved one. So much so that it is common in horror films to have that as the driving force of the plot. While trying to reach the dead is common enough, A Dark Song manages to give a completely unique take on this concept. The ritual in this film isn’t some simple incantation or sacrifice that allows you to achieve your goal in a matter of minutes. It is a series of precise and intricate rituals that have to be performed over and over for weeks on end in order to purify your soul. The tedious nature of this makes the film very intense, almost even anxiety inducing. If one little mistake is made it could all end in disaster. What’s even worse is that the pair are trapped inside a house together for the entirety of the process, adding a claustrophobic feel to the situation. The first 3/4 of the film focuses entirely on the ritual process. Then there is a shift in events, and the last 1/4 of the film involves more excitement. No matter which part of the film you focus on, the originality of the plot is simply undeniable.

While A Dark Song is very much about magic and the occult, it is also about a woman against the world. Sophia has completely dedicated her time, money, and life to finding someone to perform this ritual. While her motives may not be quite what they appear, she is clearly consumed by the death of her son. Her family is against what she is doing, and she has no true support system. Even the occultist, Solomon, acts against Sophia. Despite the fact that she is paying him to perform this ritual he makes it clear that he is in charge, and Sophia has to do anything and everything he tells her to do. It creates a bizarre dynamic between the two because Sophia must follow Solomon’s instructions to achieve her goal, yet she clearly feels hatred towards him and following his orders goes against her instincts.

Because 90% of this film focuses on two characters it would not have turned out so brilliantly if it hadn’t been for the exquisite talent of the actors. Catherine Walker (Leap Year, Patrick’s Day) plays the grieving mother, Sophia. Walker does such a phenomenal job of showing Sophia’s internal struggle of wanting to complete the ritual, yet being distrustful of the occultist who is supposed to help her. It is amazing how her feelings play so well on her face, even if her actions are saying something different. Steve Oram (The Canal, At World’s End) is also fantastic as the occultist, Solomon. Even though he is there to help Sophia, and being paid to do so, Solomon has no filter and makes sure it is clear he is in charge. Oram plays this part so well because he manages to be completely deplorable while also making the audience like him for what he is doing to help Sophia. The dynamic between these two actors is so incredible that I couldn’t imagine any other actors in these roles.

A variety of effects are used throughout the film. While most of the effects can be seen at the climax, there are still some smaller ones scattered throughout earlier in the film. One scene that stands out early-on employs CGI to make it appear as though gold flakes are raining down from the ceiling. It is so beautifully done and adds an element of fantasy and whimsy in a film that is otherwise completely shrouded in darkness. The practical effects in A Dark Song are used sparingly and, again, primarily during the climax (so I won’t go into detail). I can say that they are well done and very creepy. The ultimate scene of the climax utilizes gorgeous CGI. Again, I won’t go into too much detail, but while the scene is beautifully done it will definitely divide audiences on whether they like it or not. I personally think it works quite well with the story, but others might find it to be a bit much.

A Dark Song is a gorgeous film that is guaranteed to be polarizing to audiences. Some people will prefer the first section of the film because of the tense feeling it creates, while other will find it a bit slow and boring. Then there will be some who prefer the last part of the film because it has the most action, and others will dislike it because it feels less grounded in reality than the rest of the film. Even the ultimate climax of the film is quite polarizing in how audiences will view it. As a whole, I think the film is fantastic. It is intense, beautiful, frightening at times, expertly acted, and has some of the most unique pieces of plot and imagery I have ever seen.

OVERALL RATING: 9/10