Paul Hibbard

A Really Nice Guy (Short)

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Sean believes he has seen the girl of his dreams – she just doesn’t know it yet. With the help of his friend, Milo, Sean makes a series of unfortunate attempts to connect with this dream girl. Yet from the dream girl’s perspective, Sean’s “romantic” gestures are anything but.

This unique film was co-written and directed by Christina Przada and Paul Hibbard. What makes A Really Nice Guy feel different is the fact that it feels like two completely different style films combined in one short. On the one hand the short is a goofy buddy comedy. It follows two men, one of whom happens to see the girl of his dreams while out and about. The friends hatch a plan to try to get the dream girl’s attention and ask her out on a date. Then there is an entirely different film from the dream girl’s perspective. A woman, weary from going on dates with losers and creeps, is just trying to go about her day. Then she notices two strange men following her.

There are multiple aspects of this short film that make it a compelling watch. The most obvious is the poignant plot. It not only shows the things women are forced to endure from men, but it also helps to convey to men how some of their “nice guy” behavior can be anything but nice to a woman. The difference between the two perspectives is shown through changes in acting style, tone, cinematography, etc. It begins by showing the man and woman both getting ready for the day in seemingly similar ways, but gradually the differences become much more apparent.

From the man’s perspective everything is just a bit goofier. The most obvious ways this is conveyed is the color palette and the performances. All of the colors are very bright and cheery. When it comes to the performances, they are slightly over-the-top, but it works with the formatting of the short. Clayton Bury (Safe and Happy, Confined) stars as the self-proclaimed “nice guy,” Sean. His best friend, Milo, is played by Pete Papavlasopoulos (The Blair Trump Project, Time of Death). Both men are equally misguided in their quest to get Sean’s dream girl and the performances from both Bury and Papavlasopoulos are ridiculous and goofy. Within the context of this film, this kind of performance works well to help tell the story of how the men are completely oblivious to how unsettling their behavior truly is. It also allows for some comedy to break up an otherwise very serious topic.

From the woman’s perspective, everything is different. The most immediate difference is in the look and feel of her perspective. Her point of view takes on a slightly more monochromatic look with a bit of a gritty edge to it. Carlie Lawrence (Supermen: World War) plays Courtney. What makes her performance especially interesting is how she conveys the things a woman will often go through in order to find the perfect man, only to grab the attention of the creeps, weirdos, stalkers, and men who claim to be “nice guys.” Lawrence also perfectly conveys how women have to always be alert when we are out just trying to go about our lives. This important part of daily life as a woman coupled with how Courtney’s POV is filmed allows for a lot of tension to be built. We as the viewer may know that she is not in any real danger, but it is easy to see why she would think she is.

A Really Nice Guy is a short film that manages to tell the same story from two completely opposing perspectives in very different styles. The way Przada and Hibbard blended the two together works very well to show the differences between how men and woman experience the dating scene. I believe this short also wisely uses humor to not only show those different points of view, but to also make the message being send more palatable. Guys don’t want to hear that their actions can be construed as creepy. Yet by adding some laughs into the mix, along with the more suspenseful aspects, the message becomes more palatable and less preachy. There are times when the humorous parts are a little too goofy, but overall the performances, style, and plot mesh together to create an enjoyable short film.

OVERALL RATING: 3.5/5