Jeremy Gardner

Bliss

bliss

A talented painter is experiencing a creative block as an important deadline approaches. In a desperate attempt to break that block, she seeks out drugs to spark her creativity. Instead she sparks a twisted journey filled with drugs, sex, hallucinations, and blood.

Writer and director Joe Begos (Almost Human, The Mind’s Eye) brings his distinctive flare in his latest horror film, Bliss. Much like his previous films, Begos creates a stunning, 80’s-inspired film that relies heavily on complex characters, a unique plot, fantastic practical effects, and brilliant music. Bliss is a film that takes a unique look at vampirism, addiction, and obsession. The film follows Dezzy, the talented young artist who is on a tight deadline to finish her next big piece or else she will go broke. After a long time with no real progress on her latest work, she decides it’s time to hit up an old friend who can provide her with drugs that will hopefully bring artistic inspiration. After a night of drugs, drinking, and partying, Dezzy’s entire world spins out of control. Between manic episodes and drug-induced stupors, it becomes more and more difficult for her to separate what is real and what isn’t.

When it comes to vampire films, it is easy to make the connection between the need for blood and addiction. Yet I feel like Bliss really conveys the gritty, less glamorous side in a truly compelling way. This is likely because audiences see Dezzy using drugs at the same time as she experiences her more eccentric addiction. Whether this is related to the drugs she’s taking or a chance encounter with an old friend, she can’t be sure. Dezzy is obsessed with finishing her masterpiece, which makes her more vulnerable to both the drugs and the need for blood. There is a disturbing co-dependence that develops between her need for drugs and blood; the physical effects not only visible in Dezzy herself, but also on the canvas. There are a few moments where the lack of mythos around these vampires can make the rules around their existence a bit confusing. It is only really noticeable in a few scenes, but the focus is more on the addictive nature of vampirism which distracts from those moments.

Fans of Begos’ films are sure to see a number of familiar faces from his previous films. The one face in Bliss that might not be as familiar is Dora Madison (All That We Destroy, Chicago Fire) starring as Dezzy. It is impossible not to fall in love with Madison in this role. Dezzy is a bit of a mess and if it wasn’t for her artwork, she would just be another jobless hack spending what money she does have on drugs and booze. Yet, between the way Begos wrote the character and the way Madison portrays her, Dezzy is an enigmatic character audiences can empathize with as she battles addiction and her own obsession to finish her art. This is truly Dezzy’s story, but another strong female performance comes from Tru Collins (Awkward, The Price) as Courtney. She has many of the same demons as Dezzy, but she’s much more wild and unpredictable. Collins plays the character in a way where her intentions are always hidden until the last minute, making her quite unpredictable. Fans will also be pleased to see indie film favorites such as Jeremy Gardner (The Battery, The Mind’s Eye), Graham Skipper (The Mind’s Eye, Beyond the Gates), and Rhys Wakefield (The Purge, You Get Me).

Bliss is a film that assaults your senses, in the best way possible. Visually, the film has a dreaminess to it. Much of the film forces the audience to look through a haze, lending a vintage look to everything. That haze is backlit by bright neon lights, drawing the viewer’s eye to specific areas on screen. To add a bit of grit to that dreaminess, each scene takes place in dirty sets spattered with drugs and drenched in blood. Begos fans have come to expect amazing practical effects in his films and Bliss doesn’t disappoint. These effects are grotesque, realistic, and add to the visual appeal of the film. Then there is the music, which ties everything together quite beautifully. Steve More (Mayhem, The Guest) composed the fantastic score. It perfectly ties together the gritty and dreamy visuals of Bliss and compels the viewer to turn the volume up.

Bliss is a gritty, blood-soaked fever dream that perfectly blends vampirism and addiction on film. Begos wows once again by bringing his unique filmmaking style to a subgenre of horror that has been done to death, yet he manages to make it feel fresh. At times the vampire mythos is too vague, but it’s clear the focus is meant to be on the addiction. The entire film feels like a manic episode and the stunning look of the film only adds to that feeling. Madison carries the film on her very capable shoulders with some horror favorites working alongside her. A rocking musical score and amazing practical effects result in a truly gorgeous film.

OVERALL SCORE: 8/10