Hulu

Sea Fever

A research scientist in Ireland charters a spot on a fishing boat to study any abnormalities in the boat’s catch. The ship is suddenly marooned in the middle of the ocean. The small group discovers some kind of giant aquatic creature has taken hold of the boat and it has unleashed deadly parasites that threaten the lives of the entire crew.

Writer and director Neasa Hardiman (Jessica Jones, Happy Valley) delivers a disturbing new aquatic horror film with Sea Fever. The film quickly establishes Siobhán, the scientist, as a loner amongst her peers who is dedicated to her analytical research. Her boss is making her work out in the field to come out of her shell. Despite their better judgement, the boat crew take her on because they need the money. When a huge, frightening sea creature grabs hold of their ship it leaves them marooned in the middle of the ocean. Even worse, the creature has unleashed a deadly parasite. The tension between the members of the crew and the terror from not knowing who is infected not only create a frightening film, but the subject is also very topical with the state of the world right now. An added suspenseful aspect is a battle between those who know the importance of quarantine and those who think only of themselves and desperately want to get home. It is something we are currently living, but done on a smaller scale and with a parasite that almost certainly means death for those who are infected. It’s truly terrifying, although there are a few minor aspects of the plot that leave bigger unanswered questions.

One aspect of Sea Fever that I find truly fascinating and well done is the juxtaposition of science and superstition. Siobhán is a very calculated individual and sticks to the facts. Her marine biology background proves to be very helpful in figuring out what is happening when they encounter the mysterious creature and the parasites. On the other hand, most of the ship’s crew is incredibly superstitious. We learn this very quickly when they discover Siobhán has red hair, which is apparently considered bad luck. While she is trying to use her scientific rationale to help them all survive, the crew is constantly combatting her because of their superstitious beliefs. Seeing these two opposing sides adds a human danger to what’s happening while also showing how turning you back on science only makes things far worse.

The performances are all absolutely fantastic. It’s difficult to narrow down the standouts from Sea Fever because they all truly give it their all. Hermione Corfield (Rust Creek, Slaughterhouse Rulez) stars as Siobhán. Corfield initially plays Siobhán very socially awkward, but the more time she spends with the crew the more she seems to be in her element. This is especially noticeable as she takes charge when using her knowledge to try to save the crew. Dougray Scott (Ever After, Mission: Impossible II) plays the ship’s captain, Gerard. Gerard is arguably the most superstitious person on the ship. Scott conveys this quite well as Gerard becomes increasingly hostile the more dire the situation gets. Ardalan Esmaili (Greyzone, Domino) plays the ship’s engineer, Omid. Esmaili is fantastic in this role, acting as a sort of intermediary. As an engineer, Omid clearly has a very scientific mind and sees Siobhán’s point of view, but because he has worked on the boat for so long, he also understands the superstitions. Other brilliant performances come from Jack Hickey (Mary Shelley) as Johnny, Olwen Fouéré (Mandy) as Ciara, Connie Nielsen (Wonder Woman) as Freya, and Elie Bouakaze in his debut as Sudi.

Horror fans will not be disappointed by the visuals in Sea Fever. The setting alone sets the tone for the film. The fishing boat seems to be in need of repair and helps create a claustrophobic feeling once they’re out on the open ocean. The creature design is also quite stunning. It is huge, ominous, and also beautiful with its bioluminescence. What makes the creature even more frightening is that we never see the entire creature. It lurks in the dark depths where we can’t see it, so we can only guess its true size and what it looks like. It’s very clever because the audience gets to see the creepy glowing CGI tentacles, but the rest is left to the imagination. There is also some disgusting goo and smaller creepy crawly parasites. These are created by a combination of CGI and practical effects. The practically created wounds are also beautifully grotesque.

Sea Fever is a topical aquatic horror film that combines the frights of a creature feature with the suspense of an outbreak film. Hardiman absolutely kills it with this film, delivering as much heightened tension as she does fear of what’s lurking below in the deep waters. The battle between science and superstition throughout the film makes it especially fascinating and relevant. On top of the great plot are brilliant performances from the entire cast and a smartly designed menacing deep sea creature. This is a film that will make people afraid of what is waiting for them in the ocean’s depths.

OVERALL RATING: 8.5/10

The Lodge

MV5BNDQ2YWVmZjEtMTE1ZS00MDk1LTg5ODUtMDVlODk0OTM2ODMwXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMTkxNjUyNQ@@._V1_SY1000_SX675_AL_

Grace goes on a holiday trip with her fiancé and soon-to-be step-children. Her relationship with the kids gets off to a rocky start. Things only become more awkward when her fiancé has to return to the city for a couple days. Then, when things finally start looking up, frightening events unravel in this wintery hell.

Veronika Franz and Severin Fiala, of Goodnight Mommy fame, bring their latest slow-burn of a film. The Lodge is co-directed and co-written by the duo, along with Sergio Casci (The Caller) also co-writing the screenplay. The film begins by introducing the father, his ex, and their two children. The audience gets to learn their family dynamic as well as how each family member feels about Grace long before her character is introduced. It isn’t until the father and children take their holiday trip to their winter getaway that Grace comes into the picture. This is an interesting tactic that allows us to gain all of our knowledge about Grace from unreliable second-hand sources who are openly hostile towards Grace. Suspense slowly builds from the tense relationship between Grace and the kids to outright terror as the trio is left stranded without food or heat in a winter storm. Franz, Fiala, and Sergio do a great job of crafting terror around the unknown. So many questions come up about what’s really happening as events unfold, leading to a truly haunting climax.

To say that The Lodge is bleak would be an understatement. The filmmakers are not afraid to deliver a film that’s as harsh and cold as the landscape. Between that and the slow pace of the plot, there are likely horror fans who won’t enjoy this film as much as others. I believe the pace was pitch-perfect for the story being told. Each layer of mystery is given time to be unraveled from the supernatural, to the religious, to the more earthly dangers. The one thing that doesn’t work as well for me is how the filmmakers telegraph the truth behind what’s happening a bit too clearly. This was also my biggest issue with the filmmakers’ previous film, Goodnight Mommy, although they did manage to be a bit more subtle with The Lodge. While the big twist might not be as much of a surprise as intended, it doesn’t change how impactful the final moments of the film are.

For a smaller indie horror film, The Lodge truly has a fantastic cast of easily recognizable faces. Riley Keough (It Comes At Night, Mad Max: Fury Road) stars as Grace. At first Grace comes across as cold and emotionless. After learning she is on medications for her childhood trauma, her personality makes more sense. Keough really brings the character to life once Grace is forced to go off her meds and her sanity gradually falls to pieces. Jaeden Martell (IT, Knives Out) plays Aidan, the angry son and protective older brother. Martell does a wonderful job of injecting his performance with an underlying sinister tone, even when he’s being kind to Grace. The only time Aidan feels genuine is when he’s interacting with his younger sister, and Martell makes those moments stand out. Lia McHugh (They Come Knocking, Along Came the Devil) plays young Mia. McHugh’s performance overall is great, but she really shines when she conveys Mia’s emotional devastation. It’s truly heartbreaking and on par with Florence Pugh’s performance in Midsommar. It’s also important to give shout outs to Richard Armitage (The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, Into the Storm) as loving father Richard and Alicia Silverstone (Clueless, The Crush) as the jilted ex-wife, Laura.

To create this austere tale, The Lodge employs a combination of chilling sights and sounds. Of course the beautiful cinematography and harsh setting are a large part of the film’s appeal, but there is more than that. One thing viewers are sure to notice is the dollhouse. Mia has an exact dollhouse replica of the vacation house, complete with a doll for each family member. The filmmakers often use shots of the dollhouse as a means to add a distinct eeriness to what is happening in the real house. There is also quite a bit of religious iconography used throughout the film. These images are not only unsettling, but they offer a connection between Grace’s past and present in a way that is both striking and disturbing. Rounding each scene out is the musical score by Danny Bensi (N0S4A2, The Outsider) and Saunder Jurriaans (N0S4A2, The Outsider). The combination of dissonant booms, stirring strings, and light trilling like snow falling lends itself to this grim tale.

The Lodge is a sombre psychological thriller that leaves the viewers feeling as desolate as the landscape. The filmmakers clearly know how to fashion a suspenseful plot that forces you to wonder what is real and what isn’t. That being said, there are some clues that make the final revelation a bit too obvious. Luckily, the final moments of the film still bring shock and awe. The performances from the star-studded cast and stunning artistry of the film add to the emotional devastation that ensues. The Lodge is sure to be a new favorite feel-bad film horror fans watch for the holidays.

OVERALL RATING: 7.5/10