Girl on the Third Floor

Girl on the Third Floor

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Don buys an old home in a small town. He plans to fix it up so he and his pregnant wife can get a fresh start. The more work he does on the home, the more he learns about the secrets hidden within its walls, and those secrets are out for blood.

This supernatural thriller is the feature film debut for director Travis Stevens, who also wrote the screenplay inspired by Trent Haaga, Paul Johnstone, and Ben Parker. Girl on the Third Floor wastes no time in getting the juices flowing. From the moment Don enters the house, there is obviously something ominous at work. The film also makes sure to immediately make the viewers uncomfortable with some very disgusting looking fluids found throughout the house. As Don begins working on the home to fix it up, those fluids seem to become more active. The house clearly has a life of its own, as well as some other strange inhabitants. Despite the immediate eeriness and unease of the film, it’s still more of a slow burn. The audience is gradually given new clues and bits of information leading up to the nightmarish conclusion.

Girl on the Third Floor is a strange and unique nightmare. It combines elements of a haunted house film, a Fatal Attraction-esque thriller, and body horror. The haunted house element is the most obvious. The decrepit old home clearly has a sordid past and the restless spirits to go along with it. When Don settles into the house, he meets a mysterious, seductive woman. What he thought was a one night stand turns into repeated ominous visits and thinly veiled threats that could destroy his relationship with his pregnant wife. When it comes to the body horror aspect, I don’t necessarily mean a human body. The body in the case of Girl on the Third Floor refers to the house itself. The house is clearly a living thing and this is especially apparent when the house gets ooey and gooey in response to Don knocking holes in the wall and fixing things up. All of these elements combine to tell a tale of morality and show just how dire the consequences to your actions can be.

With a small cast, Girl on the Third Floor has a great range of performances. Phil “C.M. Punk” Brooks (Rabid) stars as Don. Don is really not a very likable guy. He lost his job after doing something illegal, he’s an alcoholic, and he cheats on his pregnant wife. Yet Phil Brooks manages to play Don in a way that is just endearing enough to make you like the guy, but you still want to see Don get what’s coming to him. Sarah Brooks (There, Chicago Med) plays the mysterious Sarah. Sarah Brooks is the perfect combination of sultry and sinister in this role. Trieste Kelly Dunn (Blindspot, The Push) plays Don’s wife, Liz. While Liz at first glance appears to be the typical loving wife who trusts her husband and is carrying his child, it eventually becomes clear she is much more than that. She’s the sole breadwinner, running a business while also going through pregnancy and picking up the pieces of her husband’s failures. Dunn not only does a fantastic job in this role, but she offers a strong juxtaposition as a truly good, successful person compared to Don’s overall failure. Honorable mention goes to the house itself, which might not be a credited actor, but definitely is a vital character in this film.

There is no shortage of artistry in Girl on the Third Floor. Everything from the camera angles, to the practical effects, to the copious amounts of goo combine to create a stunning film. There is a lot of great camera work. There may be something happening in the foreground, but the camera work will draw your eye to minute details that normally would just catch the corner of your eye. The practical effects overall are stunning. Much of it is truly unique, especially for one specific character, and straddles the line of realism and fantasy. One specific kill is questionable in terms of how realistic it is, but the effects themselves are still very well done. Of course this film wouldn’t be quite as effective if it wasn’t for all the icky bits. All of the ooze and goo and slime help to make the audience as uneasy as possible and it definitely does the trick.

Girl on the Third Floor oozes atmosphere as it tells a disturbing and sticky tale of morality. Stevens proves that he is a highly skilled storyteller in his feature-film directorial debut. He not only knows how to create a compelling film, but he knows how to make viewers squirm in their seats while watching. Phil Brooks gives a surprisingly good performance and manages to hold his own alongside both Sarah Brooks and Dunn. The combination of the visceral use of slime, practical effects, and cinematography creates a stunning film. This film has a little something for everyone with the overlapping themes and is definitely a must-watch for horror fans.

OVERALL RATING: 8.5/10